Express Detox Green Smoothie

 

express detox green smoothie

As Kermit the Frog has said, “it’s not easy being green”….and the same could be said for being a green smoothie in a sea of fluorescent orange fizzy sodas and caramel-colored coffee drinks.  The green smoothie can intimidate – with its heavy perception of being healthy (aka “gross”)- but this Express Detox Smoothie is sweet, light and satisfying. It’s a great way to start a warm summer morning before a busy day with the family or to refresh after yoga or mowing the lawn. From 10TV anchors to our littlest test kitchen ‘client’/niece, it’s been well-received.

Now’s your chance; do you think it’s easy being or drinking ‘green’?

Ingredients

1 cup of water or coconut water
2 cups of kale
1 lemon, juiced
1 medium apple
1 frozen banana
2 pitted dates
1″ ginger root

Instructions

Add all ingredients to high-powered blender and blend well.

Want to be even greener? Check out our Green Smoothie Challenge eBook .

10 Easy Switches for a Plant-based Diet

10 Easy Switches for a Plant-based Diet1

Hear ye, hear ye!

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: you do not need to eat twigs and tofu to be a healthy person. More importantly, you can ENJOY your food while improving your health!

Our position on the non-exclusivity of health and enjoyment delicious food remains unchanged. With regards to the plant-based diet and your health goals, it IS possible to have it all. We present to you 10 easy switches for a plant-based diet, from simple substitutions for recipes to a plethora of meal and snack ideas. Here we go!

Simple Substitutions

Try non-dairy milk instead of cow’s milk (i.e. almond, cashew milk are healthy alternatives and are widely available in grocery stores – or easy to make yourself!)

Instead of butter, consider coconut oil (for baking, spreading on toast)

Try nutritional yeast instead of cheese (sprinkle on top of popcorn, make mac+ cheese)

Tahini and hummus instead of dairy-based dressings or dips (i.e. Ranch)

Ideas for Meals

Breakfast

oatmeal with fruit and nuts

avocado or nut butter on toast

green smoothie

Lunch & Dinner

rice, beans, and veggies in a bowl

cauliflower walnut ‘meat’ tacos

pasta with tomato sauce and vegetables

spicy Indian dal

baked sweet potato with vegetarian chili on top

Snacks

popcorn seasoned with nutritional yeast, garlic powder, and sea salt

raspberry coconut ice cream

carrots, apple, or celery with nut butter

sweet potato fries

DIY trail mix with nuts, seeds, & dried fruit

Did you notice? Being over-achievers, we gave more than 10 tips and ideas to help You make the transition to more of a plant-based diet. Whether it’s a ‘meatless Monday’ or ‘vegan before 5pm’ goal you have, these ideas will tickle your tastebuds and provide your body with nourishment.

10TV Recipe: Cocoa-Maca Energy Balls

cocoa-maca energy balls

If you watched last month’s segment on 10TV, you learned about the factors which can make us feel FAT & TIRED as well as the top 10 foods for increasing our natural energy levels. One of the ideas featured was our Cocoa-Maca Energy Balls; it’s a great pick-me-up for the 3pm slump and a delicious, chocolate-y treat.

Prep time: 5-10 minutes
Servings: 24 energy balls

Ingredients

1 cup coconut oil, melted
2.5 cups shredded coconut
1 cup cacao powder (or cocoa powder)
1/2 cup maple syrup
1 tsp vanilla extract
1/2 tsp cayenne powder
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp maca powder

Instructions

Put shredded coconut, cacao powder, cinnamon and cayenne in medium bowl. Mix melted coconut oil, maple syrup, and vanilla extract and pour over dry ingredients. Combine well and put in freezer for about 15 minutes. Remove mixture and shape into balls; recipe makes 24. Store in fridge for up to a week or in freezer for up to 3 months.

 

From Culinary to Cancer: Kitchen Herbs

With the high-fat, sugar, and salt foods we encounter on a regular basis as part of our daily diets, it’s been a questions on people’s minds: how do we make healthy food taste good?

Enter herbs and spices, nature’s flavor enhancers! Many herbs and spices also have health benefits – from increasing beauty to cancer prevention! Check your herbal knowledge here:

Want to improve your score? Come to our class on Thursday, June 7th, we will cover quick and easy ways to get in the habit of adding a variety of herbs and spices to add a healthy kick to your menu. Various herbs & spices, as well as flavor combinations will be demonstrated and discussed.

Meatless Monday: Cauliflower & Walnut Crumbles

cauliflower taco

Whether you’re trying a Meatless Monday, Taco Tuesday, or want to creatively use some delicious and healthy faux ‘ground beef’ crumbles, it’s your lucky day! This recipe provides a delicious alternative to store-bought processed soy crumbles with questionable ingredients. It’s smoky, savory and completely plant-based.

Use it for tacos, lasagna, spaghetti and marinara sauce, chili, and wraps!

Ingredients

1 head of cauliflower (about 3 cups)
8oz fresh mushrooms (we used cremini)
1 cup walnuts
3 tablespoons coconut aminos or tamari (gluten-free soy sauce)
1 tablespoon balsamic vinaigrette
1 tablespoon chili powder
1/2 tablespoon cumin
2 teaspoons adobo seasoning
2 teaspoons paprika
2 teaspoons garlic powder
2 teaspoons onion powder
1/2 teaspoon black pepper and of salt

Instructions

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. After removing the core and leaves of the cauliflower, start pulsing it in food processor (depending on how large your food processor is, this may require multiple attempts); it should have the look and consistency of rice. Pulse the mushrooms and the walnuts until about the same size pieces as the cauliflower. Add cauliflower, mushrooms, and walnuts into a large bowl and mix in coconut aminos or tamari. Stir in all spices including salt and pepper and mix well. Line baking sheet with parchment paper (to prevent sticking) and spread mixture on top. Bake for 25 minutes then stir and turn mixture (to ensure evenness) before baking another 15-20 minutes.

If making tacos, garnish with cilantro, chopped red onion and romaine lettuce, and your favorite salsa. For spaghetti sauce, add meat crumbles to your heated tomato sauce along with some chopped parsley and stir well.

Dietitian vs. Nutritionist

dietitian vs nutritionist one bite wellness

If you’re confused about the difference between a registered dietitian (R.D.) and a nutritionist, you’re not the only one. After meeting with a doctor last week who asked this question, we figured it was high-time to explore the education, options, and state requirements with you. It’s confusing out there, so let’s clarify this situation.

Whether your goals include losing weight, having a healthy pregnancy, reducing high blood sugars and cholesterol, or improving athletic performance, diet is the place to start. A professional who specializes in nutrition is key, since their advice is based on knowledge, skills, and experience. But why might you want to make an appointment with a registered dietitian and not a nutritionist?

The key difference is in the education and training each has received. Outside of Ohio and a few other states, nutritionists often do not require any formal training, license, nor certification in order to set up a practice. Essentially anyone can call themselves a nutritionist in certain states such as Colorado and California, where there isn’t any requirement to be licensed (or even educated) as a nutritionist.

If you live in Ohio, someone who calls himself/herself a nutritionist is a registered dietitian (or is breaking the law). The person has been licensed by the Ohio Board of Dietetics (now the State Medical Board of Ohio) and may use the terms ‘clinical nutritionist’,’nutrition counselor’ and ‘nutrition consultant.’ A registered dietitian has completed the following:

  1. A minimum of a four-year college degree, with specific study of human nutrition through the life cycles, anatomy and physiology, as well as other sciences
  2. A 1,200-hour minimum, supervised internship
  3. Passed a national credentialing exam, which covers nutrition information from clinical to food service and community aspects
  4. Maintaining at least 75 continuing education credits every 5 years

Dietitians comply with a code of ethics by which to guide their practice and rely on evidence-based nutrition recommendations.

If you’re in a state outside of Ohio (perhaps one that doesn’t require licensing), know that some of the people calling themselves nutritionists can still be helpful and knowledgeable. To seek the advice and expertise of a registered dietitian, you can look for the RD or RDN (registered dietitian nutritionist) initials after their name.

Film Review: Food Evolution – Pro-Science or Pro-GMO?

foodevolutionphoto

Photo source: foodevolutionmovie.com

Film Review: Food Evolution

By Adrienne Raimo, RDN

Description: The film Food Evolution asserts that genetically modified organisms (GMOs), despite a controversial reputation, are a safe and intelligent solution to feeding an over-populated world.

Synopsis: Through his film, Food Evolution, the director aims to furnish some answers to the questions of how the science behind GMOs might be used to feed the earth’s growing population. While portraying those concerned about the health and environmental impacts of GMOs as misinformed and fear-mongering, he champions the developments of certain GMO foods as a way to improve crop resistance to disease and drought. The film tries to assume an objective, evidence-based analysis of the science behind GMOs as a safe and reasonable solution for looming issues of food security and sustainability as well as environmental health.

Continue reading

Recipe: Avocado Egg Salad

nationaleggsaladweek

We’re celebrating National Egg Salad Week by sharing two delicious recipes – Avocado Egg Salad (made without mayonnaise!) AND an egg-less, vegan version with chickpeas. Pull those leftover, hard-boiled eggs from the fridge and let’s get started!

Avocado Egg Salad (vegan optional)
Serves 2-3
Prep time: 8 minutes

4 organic large eggs (substitute a 15oz can of drained chickpeas for eggs to make vegan)
1/2 avocado, pitted and chopped
1 tsp mustard
1/8 cup green onions, chopped
1/8 cup fresh parsley, chopped
1 tbsp of apple cider vinegar or lime juice (helps prevent browning of avocado)
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/4 tsp dill weed
Pinch of paprika
Salt & pepper to taste

Instructions

Mash avocado in a medium bowl then repeat mashing when you add the hard-boiled eggs (or chickpeas) to the bowl. Mix all other ingredients into the bowl, except paprika.

Egg salad is best served chilled. Stick mixture in the fridge for at least 1/2 hr before garnishing with paprika and enjoying on your favorite bread, on top of a bed of greens, or in a wrap.

eggsaladsandwich

Serving vs. Portion Size

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Dark chocolate coconut ice cream with banana chips, gluten-free mini cookies, and dark chocolate pieces. Truly decadent.

Do you know how much you’re really eating? It can be difficult to tell if our portion sizes are right for our bodies’ nutritional needs.

Portion sizes have grown quite drastically in recent decades and, with it, people’s waistlines and confusion about how much they are eating versus what they should. Let’s get back to the basics. Even with healthy food, eating too much can add inches to our waistlines and counteract progress to our goals.

What is a serving size and how do I find it?

The serving size is the amount of food listed on a product’s nutrition facts label, along with the nutritional values (calories, protein, fiber, sugar, carbohydrates, etc) associated with that amount of food. So let’s say you are drinking a 20oz soda and the serving size is 8oz; there are 2.5 servings in the bottle. If you drink that whole bottle, you’ll need to multiply 2.5 with all of the calories, sugar, carbohydrates and more listed in the nutrition facts label. It’s sobering.

For foods without a nutrition facts label, how will you know what a serving size is? Luckily WebMD has a handy-dandy handout with some common household items as a reference point for servings of various fruits, vegetables, grains, and more.

Okay, but how many servings of each food should I eat?

Here’s a guide from the American Heart Association with suggested serving sizes from each food group to get started. Remember, your needs and chosen food groups may be different from what is listed. It’s a guide; reach out to your nutrition professional to set up an individualized plan (especially if there are certain food groups you’re avoiding due to food allergies or sensitivities or dietary preferences, such as being gluten-free or vegetarian/vegan).

Whaaaa? It’s says here my ice cream servings is 1/2 cup. That’s totally too small!

First, as fellow ice cream lovers, we agree with you. This part of your exploration may shock you. Check out serving sizes for cheese, nuts, and oils for further surprises.

What’s the difference between serving and portion sizes then?

A portion size is the amount of food we choose to eat at one time and this means we can control our portion sizes. We can choose to eat less than a serving of food or multiples of it.

So as discussed before, the serving size of ice cream is 1/2 cup; however, the portion size can vary…it is the amount of food you choose to eat in one sitting. So, for ice cream, you/me/we may choose to eat closer to 1 cup of this decadent dessert. In this case we’ve all screamed for more ice cream and promptly devoured 1 portion but 2 servings total.

What I do now?

How far do you want to take this? It can be helpful to use measuring cups to actually see what 1/2 cup of ice cream or 2 Tbsp of nuts looks like. Counting out a serving size of pretzels or chips can be eye-opening as well.

You can also stick with a guideline of 1/2 your plate being vegetables, 1/4 of it being protein, and 1/4 of it being starch (try for whole grains or healthier starchy vegetable such as sweet potato versus macaroni and cheese or pasta).

Consider tracking your serving sizes and portion sizes for a few days; you can write the food you eat and the amount down in a food journal or use an app such as MyFitnessPal. Increased awareness may jump-start a few small changes in how much you eat and can help with weight loss.