Gluten-free Cashew Coconut Bread

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Oh bread, how we have missed thee! Especially this easy, nutritious version using the blender. This bread is amazing for sandwiches, French toast, snacking and more.

Here we have a gluten-free, paleo (grain-free) and yet totally delicious bread that is very quick to prepare. The most difficult part is the patience required while the bread bakes.

Prep time: 5-7 minutes

Bake time: 40-45 minutes

Ingredients

5 eggs

1/3 cup almond milk (or DIY almond milk)

1 cup raw cashews

1 cup almond meal

5 tbsp coconut flour

3 tbsp apple cider vinegar

1 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp sea salt

Instructions

Pre-heat oven to 325 degrees. Place small, oven-safe bowl with 1-2 inches of water on oven rack (this helps with creating bread’s moistness). Dump all ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend until creamy consistency (we told you this was easy! :D). Oil a loaf pan and then scrape the contents of blender into loaf pan. Smooth and bake for about 40-45 minutes or until knife inserted into center comes out clean. Cool for 15-20 minutes before digging in!

 

 

Where is your Motivation?

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This writing is inspired by a conversation we had with a realtor last night. A man in his 50s, he had recently lost 12 lbs by “going to a gym and setting goals” for himself. He relayed how, unlike him, one of his female friends has struggled in the weight loss realm– “she texted me last night to say she’s ordering some microwaveable diet boxes sent to her home.” It was hard not to let a groan escape while protesting, “but a client just got off of that stuff and is losing weight; she can do it too!”

Why are some people successful – “I set goals and go after them” – versus those who set goals and 3 days later find their manifesto is buried under the mail on the coffee table?

It’s not like second group didn’t set goals (though typically the goals are too broad to be S.M.A.R.T. ) so why aren’t THEY able to implement them?

Over the years of working with clients, we have noticed a variety of factors playing into a client’s success in reaching their health and lifestyle goals. Readiness for change, motivation, creative problem-solving, dedication, contingency planning, and a willingness to make the financial and time investment for their health all can play a part.

Here’s another way to view motivation

Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project, has created four categories people may fall into based on how they respond to internal and external motivators. These are the Upholder, Obliger, Questioner, and Rebel. In general, Upholders are motivated by internal and external factors; Questioners want to know what the rules are and why they should follow them (if the reason suits them, they will internalize this for action); Rebels flount the rules while seeking freedom and self-determinism; and Obligers respond to external expectations but not their own internal ones (i.e. the ‘manifesto’ mentioned above) and hate the feeling of letting someone down.

The Upholders we work with are very good executors of recommendations; they are energized by a list of recommendations and like to turn them into to-do lists which they can check off with a sense of accomplishment. They are motivated to not disappoint others (their healthcare provider, for example) and they tend to be very hard on themselves or feel upset when they don’t follow through on their goals or recommendations.

What we see most in our practice are Obligers and here’s what is typically related during the initial consultation:

“I have health issues and am aware of what I should be doing but I’m not sure why I cannot seem to follow through. I’ve been on soooo many diets. My neighbor went gluten-free and lost 20lbs, why can’t I? ” These people float in a sea of information but aren’t sure what to exclude/include, how to synthesize it….or the big one, how to take action in a sustainable manner. They are generally overwhelmed and feel a sense of shame over what they ‘should’ be doing.

As we work together, they enjoy aiming to be a ‘gold star’ client and they end up putting recommendations into place. They receive support when they ‘fall off’ the wagon and are reassured and encouraged to think of how to overcome obstacles to problems. They start taking better care of themselves – not just with food, but by taking time for exercise or reflection.

They are successful in reaching their goals because they have a nutritionist & health coach who understands what motivates them, provides longer-term support, guidance and accountability.

In fact, we are One Bite Wellness are dedicated to ‘walking our talk’ in this arena too. Many clients are surprised when we tell them that we have our own accountability partner and coach. “Well, you already seem to know everything”…..knowledge, as we’ve seen above, doesn’t equal action; having someone to share obstacles with and create sustainable goals, has proven invaluable. 

An important question to ask yourself: what is driving you? Is your motivation internal or external? Where do you fall in the categories mentioned above?

When you understand where your motivation stems from, you’ll have a key to knowing the next step to take towards your goals.

Recipe: Glazed Carrot Fries

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Sometimes a nutritionist has to have her fries. Today was one of those days when the idea of warm, salty fries (and too many carrots in the fridge) married into one of the best snacks ever.

Ingredients

2lbs of carrots

1 tbsp of olive oil

1 tbsp of balsamic vinegar

sea salt + pepper

Instructions

Cut off ends of carrots and lay, in rows, on baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil then add sea salt and pepper. Use your hands to ensure carrots are evenly coated. Put in oven at 425 degrees for 15 minutes, flip over and add balsamic vinegar, and cook another 15 minutes until well-roasted. Enjoy!

Recipe for a Super Saturday

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Often times Saturday mornings are spent facilitating clients’ breakthroughs, celebrating successes, and giving hugs or high-fives.

What is an alternate plan for a dietitian on sunny Saturday? Join us and we’ll walk you though:

Waking up naturally and refreshed, without an alarm. Ahh.

Hot tea or water with lemon (or organic apple cider vinegar tonic) on the porch.

Doing something nice for someone else. Whether writing out birthday cards, a letter, or making a homemade gift to give someone, this is relaxing way to start the day.

It’s almost time for the farmers market! Good thing we prepared our delicious skillet the day before.

Drive or bike to the local market. Getting our ‘glow’ on:)

Meeting those friendly, mostly organic farmers and ranchers, while learning about food and buying the freshest ingredients. Our purchases: swisschard, bee pollen, calendula flowers, fresh tomatoes, lettuce, micro-greens, shiitake mushrooms, senposai greens (a new food adventure!), and the sweetest, juiciest strawberries!

Seeking some shade and peaceful surroundings, we found a park full of blooming flowers and brought those strawberries to snack on. Finding a comfortable bench we enjoyed the scenery – the trees, flowers, the parents and children, the photography of a just-married couple. We alternated this sensory experience with awareness of the strawberry with each bite into the juicy, seeded skin.

If it were possible to get completely inebriated from drinking in the scents pumped out by the flowers in the area, we would have been unfit for operating a motor vehicle.

We found, and continue to find, this experience transformative. The peace and ease of a morning waking up and enjoying some solitude while later connecting with farmers and food as well as friends and community, fills the spirit and the belly.

Whether the rest of the day holds a barbecue, bike ride, festival, gardening, reading a book, or hosting a pool party, it will be done with a sense of having been replenished.

Will you give it a try this Saturday?

 

 

Recipe: Clean & Easy Collard Greens

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Collard greens. They are typically associated with lard or bacon and some delicious deep-fried comfort food. Even these health-promoting greens start to lose their nutritional punch when a southern celebrity chef would throw the collards into a pan with a stick of butter or bacon grease. We always found her show on the Food Network more revoltingly gruesome than The Walking Dead.  Because of this, we have sought to share with people how to make clean and easy collard greens.

<10 minutes

Ingredients

1 bunch of (organic) collard greens

1 bunch of radishes or 1-2 medium daikon radishes

1/2 tsp soy sauce or tamari (optional)

Instructions

Cut and remove stems from the collard greens. Fold one side of the collards over to the other and roll up until it looks like a little burrito. Use a knife to slice the them, chiffonade- style (yes, we’re getting fancy here and so can you!). Put the sliced collars into a pan with about 1/2 cup of water. While they are cooking, you can start grating the radishes. Once the greens are cooked to your liking, use some tongs to move them onto a plate. Decorate with a topping of radish and add soy sauce or tamari if desired. This is a great side dish!

Ayurvedic Basics & the Seasons

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Source: flickr.com/photos/lakpura/

 

Ayurvedic medicine is over 5 thousand years old and is connected to nature and its seasons. This holistic healing system seeks to harmonize body, mind, and soul. Though it can be difficult to conceptualize from a scientific point of view, it is common sense and based on the laws of nature. You don’t need a scientific study to reflect on what may already be intuitively known; you need to eat differently based on the climate in your part of the world (tropical, desert, tundra  or grassland), the current season, your ancestry and genetics, your age, activity level, and food preferences.  All of these aspects influence how you, as an individual, should eat and live.

We at One Bite Wellness use different aspects of healing traditions and bring them in our practice. Beyond calories and carbs there lies a whole new layer of healing modalities. We endeavor, and encourage our clients, to live in harmony with the natural cycles…to take stress out of daily living, and with it the stress-fighting hormones and their toxic residues (i.e. free radicals). We want to know how well your body is getting rid of waste from your system…because what you put in your body is only part of the equation. 

What you eat is important, but so is how and when you eat. So it is important to study the characteristics of the seasons and learn how to incorporate the foods that provide balance.

The doshas – pitta, vata, and kapha- rule seasons, body types, times in our lives and more. Here’s a quick primer:

Summer is the hot and dry season, when pitta rules supreme. It is when we race around, buzzing with energy for our many activities.

Fall/Winter is the vata, or wind, season. It is characterized by cold and dryness. Nature takes time to rest instead of actively growing.

Spring is the kapha season; it is earthy, wet, and cool. It can promote a slower, heavy feeling in the body.

The foods produced during each season are typically the best to eat to help off-set effects of the season. For example, since the fall/winter season is cold and dry, our skin tends to be dry and crack and we feel cold. The foods produced and harvested during this time are warming, nourishing, and lubricating for your skin and joints. Squashes, nuts, and animal foods are typically incorporated into our meals or in soups, casseroles, and chili recipes.

During the summer season, we are hot and the foods produced by the earth are cooling; we tend to eat more raw foods – such as fruits, smoothies, salads, and gazpacho. This helps us deal with the heat of the season.

How does one find balance with each of the seasons?

The main two tools are seasonally-appropriate nutritional programs and lifestyle management. We cover how functioning of the body can go awry and how to create balance. Without a demanding a strict diet for the season, we help the client by creating a personalized nutrition protocol and teaching them how to incorporate delicious foods into their diets. In addition, we look at how to support the body, during the various seasons, with simple and fun lifestyle changes to support their bodies.

Connect with a nutrition expert and learn more about your Ayurvedic body type and how to create personalized balance – mind, body, and spirit.

Minimalism as Maximalism

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In our city and throughout the nation, people are showing an increased interest in minimalism as way of downsizing from the McMansions while addressing debt, stress and overwhelm, and feeling of isolation.

The Minimalists movie, which came out about a week ago, is a documentary about minimalism as a way of focusing on the important aspects of life. Early in the film, we learn of two friends, Ryan Nicodemus and Joshua Fields Millburn, and their discovery that climbing the corporate ladder, having a 6-figure income and lots of stuff wasn’t fulfilling them. Joshua had some heart-breaking transitions in his life (divorce and the death of his mother in the same month), but Ryan saw that he still seemed to have a greater sense of peace and calm in life. So Ryan took Joshua out to lunch and asked why. Minimalism. Through the conversation, Joshua explained the concept and Ryan became radically inspired. How do I do this and quickly, he asked. They came up with the idea of a packing party. Ryan drastically reduced his possessions and they both went on to create The Minimalists blog and to share the message of living a more meaningful life.

Minimalism is slightly counter-culture to the consumerist society we live in. It causes us to examine and challenge the beliefs we hold to be true – some inculcated early in life by marketing; and it is all based on fear. How could you possibly attract the love of your life with that breakout on your nose? Use our face wash or concealer. We’ve defined success and it’s driving in this car, the commercial will say. Who cares if you go into debt for any of your acquisitions? Everyone else has debt too, so take comfort that you are still part of the in-group. Besides, here is a bank with low-interest rates so you can ‘save’ enough money to take your family on a fabulous vacation. All of these messages sell us on the idea that we are not enough, but that we can spend our money on things that will makes us better, happier, successful people. And we’ve had a strong history of falling for it.

In our view, minimalism causes all of us to critically think about our lives – the choices, job, items, and relationships – and to remove the layers that stand between us and maximizing the freedom and joy in our lives. This could take the form of removing physical items from the environment – clearing out clothes, old shoes, picture frames, or miscellany – and it can also take the form of reducing the activities or social ties we have which don’t bring a sense of growth or joy. By doing this, we create SPACE. Space not for more stuff, but for the dreams bubbling beneath the surface of depression or malaise. Space for new people who inspire and share similar values to come into our lives. We provide space for ourselves to relax for an afternoon reading Truman Capote by the pool.

One does not need to pare down to 175 items or renounce all pleasures in life that require gear or tools. To start exploring minimalism as an idea that may benefit you, start with this inquiry:

“What is one item or activity you could minimize today that will help maximize growth or joy?”tweet this