🐉 Dragon Fruit Delight: The Surprising Benefits of Pitaya for your Skin + Gut

Are you tired of eating your boring old bananas and fruits? Well, then say hello to pitaya, also known as dragon fruit! This spiky pink fruit is not only visually stunning; it is also packed with amazing health benefits that can do wonders for your skin and gut.

Dragon fruit benefits the skin

Let’s start with the benefits to our skin. Dragon fruit is the perfect fruit to combat ‘dragon skin’. Pitaya is loaded with vitamins such as vitamin C, which helps to promote healthy skin and wound healing. Because pitaya is rich in antioxidants such as betalains and flavonoids, it can which help to protect cells from free radical damage, reduce inflammation, and slow down the signs of aging. Say goodbye to fine lines and wrinkles and hello to youthful and glowing skin! Not to mention, the fruit’s high water content helps to hydrate your skin from the inside out. Yes, please!

Pitaya is a gut superhero!

Its high fiber content helps to promote digestion and prevent constipation – essentially, pitaya helps you poo! Plus, the fruit’s probiotic properties help to maintain a healthy gut flora, which can boost your immune system and improve your overall well-being.

Dragon fruit helps your heart and nervous system too

Pitaya is a good source of magnesium, an essential mineral that plays a role in heart health and nerve function. The iron contained in dragon fruit is responsible for red blood cell production and oxygen transport in the body. It also contains potassium, which is an essential electrolyte that helps regulate blood pressure and fluid balance along with calcium which aids in muscle and nerve function.

Now that you know what pitaya can do you for your body, make sure you put this fabulous fruit on your grocery list!

How to eat dragon fruit + ways to incorporate it into your diet

Now, we know what you’re thinking. “How do I even eat this funky-looking fruit?” Well, fear not, friends, for there are countless ways to include pitaya into your culinary creations.

First up, smoothies! Simply blend pitaya with some fruit, non-dairy milk of your choice, nuts or protein powder. Here’s the 🦄 Pink Unicorn Smoothie ✨ to try

A variation of this would be a pitaya smoothie bowl which you could top off with your favorite granola, such as DIY Hippie Granola, and fresh fruit. Voila! A nutritious, Instagram-worthy breakfast.

But wait, there’s more! You can also slice up pitaya and add it to your fruit salad, mix it with some coconut water (or a margarita) for a refreshing summer beverage, make it into salsa, or even grill it for a unique and flavorful taco ingredient.

The possibilities are endless with pitaya, so get creative and enjoy this versatile and nutritious fruit in any way you like!

There you have it, folks. Pitaya, the superfruit that not only looks good but tastes delicious and also benefits your skin, gut, and heart. So go ahead, give it a try, and thank us later!

Kiwi? Oui Oui! 🥝

Nope, it’s not about the flightless bird or New Zealanders today – we are all about this tiny, overlooked fruit in grocery store that has so much to offer you. What are its nutritional credentials exactly? Well, here’s a start:

  • It has about twice the vitamin C of oranges, per serving
  • Constipated? There’s more to help than prunes and psyllium – kiwi contains fiber and an enzyme that maybe help move things along, if you get our drift
  • Folate – this B vitamin helps prevent neural tube defects in pregnancies but is also important for building red blood cells and reducing homocysteine levels
  • Antioxidants to help neutralize free radical damage

A common question is whether one can eat the skin or not. Yes, you can eat the skin. It’s fuzzy and can kind of tickle the mouth a bit, but it has fiber and the skin doesn’t have much of a taste on its own. In terms of the fruit, the texture is similar to that of a banana but with crunchy seeds in the middle (similar to chia seeds). We think these elements come together to create an interesting and sweet snack.

How to eat kiwis:

The easiest way is to slice it up and enjoy it on its own.

We love it in our Red, White & Blueberry Fruit Tart and Spiced Vanilla Chia Pudding.

How will you eat your kiwi? Share in the comments below.

Go-go Goji Berries!

The goji berry, also known as wolfberry, is a sweet orange-red fruit native to Asia. It has been eaten for thousands of years and is a staple of some of the longest-living people on earth, including the Hunza in the Himalayas. With an impressive array of nutritional properties and health benefits, you might want to include it into your diet. We’ll show you how.

Background & Nutritional Properties

Goji berries have been used both as food and botanical medicine. Fortunately, with its sweet taste (it looks like a red raisin but tastes more like a cross between a cherry and a cranberry), it ‘helps the medicine go down’, as Mary Poppins would say.

What else do goji berries offer, nutritionally-speaking? Plenty – including 18 amino acids (the building blocks of protein), high antioxidant content, more protein by weight than other fruits (e.g. oranges, apples, berries), great source of beta-carotene and vitamin C, trace minerals, B vitamins and more.

Goji berries have been extensively studied for their health benefits and have been known to:

• Strengthen the immune system
• Increase longevity and protects from premature aging
Reduce skin cancer risk
• Promote cardiovascular health
• Support eye health and vision
• Maintain healthy blood pressure and blood sugar
• Improve fertility
• Strengthen muscles and bones
• Manage weight

Ready to include more of these delicious and nutritious berries into your diet? First, let’s talk about who should NOT eat goji berries without consulting their doctor or healthcare professional. Obviously, those allergic to the berries should avoid them. Goji berries may interact with certain drugs including blood thinners and diabetes medications as well as drugs for high blood pressure.

Choosing to partake in the nourishment and benefits of these red berries? Here are some ways to include them into your go-go, busy lifestyle:

• During breakfast with DIY Hippie Granola or a warming Great Goji Groatmeal recipe or even just as a topping to your cereal

• Brew in a tea ball with loose green tea

• As a snack on its own or in a trail mix

• In smoothies and yogurt

• Paired with dark chocolate for a satisfying dessert rich in antioxidants

…and more! Goji berries have been used to make soup, stew and wine as well as herbal formulas as a tonic for health.

This nutrient-dense superfood deserves a spot in your pantry with all it can offer to you and your family. Enjoy!

Kinda Big ‘Dill’ Potato Salad

10tv national potato day

We recently celebrated National Potato Day by sharing this recipe, and the result, with Laura Borchers and Jeff Booth on WBNS 10TV. Now we’re sharing it with you and the rest of the world!

But first, some fun facts about potatoes: they were first cultivated by the Inca in South America about 7-10k years ago; the English word ‘potato’ comes from the Spanish ‘patata.’

Americans eat about 124 lbs of potatoes per year; Germans eat about twice that.

Potatoes are relatively low in calories yet they pack a nutritional punch in terms of vitamin C, potassium, and fiber!

kindofabigdillpotatosalad

Serves 4
Prep time: about 15 minutes

Ingredients
1 lb potatoes (we used 4-5 red potatoes for a bit of color in the finished product)
1 cup of chopped celery
1 cup chopped red onion
1 cup plant-based mayo (the one we used included avocado oil and aquafaba as the first two ingredients)
1 tbsp mustard
1/2 tbsp dill
1/2 tbsp apple cider vinegar
1/2 tbsp tumeric

Instructions
Boil potatoes until tender and easily pierced by fork (about 10 minutes). While the potatoes cool, mix the rest of the ingredients together well in a bowl. Once potatoes are cooled, combine with the mixture. Refrigerate and let the flavors meld for at least an hour (it’s best-tasting the next day).

As mentioned in the tv segment, these are recipe guidelines – have fun and try variations with bell pepper, parsley, and even hot sauce!

The Beauty of Ugli Fruit

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“Beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder,” Plato once said. When it comes to the uncommon and sometimes weird produce of other countries, often relegated to one stand in the grocery store, we couldn’t agree more. Whether a dragon fruit, whole young coconut, cherimoyas, or star fruit, you may find a prickly or strange exterior belies a delicious adventure for your tastebuds.

On this particular visit, we picked up a fruit with a rather horrendous complexion and took it home, preparing ourselves for what may lie inside.

But yes, it was beautiful and familiar – in both form and taste. The ugli fruit is a hybrid of grapefruit, orange and tangerine and often hails from Jamaica. Nutritionally speaking, it has fiber, vitamin C, is low-calorie, and has a multitude of vitamins and minerals. Consider eating it as you would an orange or freshly squeezed in mineral water. Enjoy!

Recipe: The One Bite Wellness “Juicy Sunrise” Drink

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Even we don’t necessarily *boing* out of bed every morning all bright-eyed and bushy-tailed. It takes a bit of finesse to adjust from the world of dreams to one of reality, with all its challenges and enjoyment. Guess what helps? A bright, delicious Juicy Sunrise drink. What this juice has is pizzazz, grace, and energizing qualities. What it doesn’t have (yet) is a Nike contract. We’re working on it.

Meanwhile, whether you’re in college, a stay-at-home-mom, or busy executive, you’ll want to get busy in your kitchen making this gorgeous, nutrient-blasting drink. It can be juiced or blended (for those who want the extra fiber).

2 oranges
1 inch ginger root
6 carrots
2 lemons

Peel the oranges, lemon, and ginger (carrots optional, if organic,
otherwise peel them). Run through the juicer (or throw in the blender) and enjoy the boost of beta-carotene, vitamin C, potassium, and more nutrients!

Eye Health & Nutrition

Fruits and vegetables

A tremendous connection exists between eating healthier and weight loss, cardiovascular health, managing blood sugar, and even eye health. Many people wait until their eyesight deteriorates in order to start making changes, but nutrition is a powerful form of preventative medicine which can help protect the eyes from disease and age-related vision loss.

By adding vital nutrients into the diet, you can start fighting the effects of aging and oxidation in the body – including the eyes. Start building up the nutrient supply by focusing on fulfilling the daily fruit and vegetable requirements of five to nine servings per day. Green leafy vegetables are an important food source for a wide array of nutrients that can improve eye health, including the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin. In addition to turnip greens, kale, and collards, another good source of lutein is found in eggs. According to the Journal of Nutrition, eating an egg a day can boost both lutein and zeaxanthin levels in the bloodstream.

  • Vitamin C can help keep eyes healthy by providing protection from the UV-damage of sun exposure. Good sources of vitamin C include strawberries, raspberries, mango, apples, bell peppers, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts. Vitamin E helps with scavenging the free radicals and can help prevent cataracts and macular degeneration. Sunflower oil, wheat germ, and almond butter are some beneficial foods with this vitamin.
  • Omega-3 fatty acids are important for the entire body and the eyes need this anti-inflammatory nutrient as well. Eating omega-3s from wild-caught fish, nuts, seeds, or supplements can help.
  • In general, avoiding processed, sugary foods, unhealthy fat sources, while maintaining a healthy weight and blood sugar levels (diabetes have a higher risk of blindness), will also help prevent eye disease.

Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of blindness among older adults in the developed countries. Macular degeneration is linked to free radicals and homocysteine levels. The passionate work of One Bite Wellness revolves around identifying genetic markers, creating a customized nutrition plan, including more antioxidants and regulating homocysteine levels, and deep-cleaning diets in a way that allows clients to experience a delicious and sustainable manner of eating.

The bottom line is to remember that the foods that are beneficial to the body are also good for the eyes. Quality water, nuts, seeds, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, healthy protein sources, and fiber are all important for maintaining overall health.

Food Focus: Sweet Potatoes

Sweet potatoes are a delightful food that can add sweetness and nutrients to any meal. Sweet potatoes are a great source of something we call beta-carotene. In the body, beta-carotene is converted into Vitamin A. Vitamin A is essential for healthy bones and vision. In addition, Vitamin A also supports a healthy immune system. Since Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin, eating your sweet potato with some healthy fat will increase your body’s ability to absorb it. Try mixing in some olive oil to your sweet potato to enhance your body’s absorption ability.

Sweet potatoes are also filled with Vitamin C, Manganese, and antioxidants. I encourage you to eat the skin because it contains additional nutrients! Sweet potatoes are a complex carbohydrate providing lots of fiber for your diet. The fiber will keep you fuller longer as well as help lower your cholesterol. This is a great alternative to a regular potato because it contains many more nutrients. In addition, there are a bunch of fun recipes you can create with sweet potatoes.